Neal Morse vs The Osmonds

Teri will probably like this blog :/

I was listening to a CD I just got in by Neal Morse, excellent christian progressive rock. It came with a bonus CD, so after listening to the 1st cd, I popped in the 2nd CD, and the first song just made me jump back hmm 25-30 years maybe? WOW!!! Below is the original version that Teri will remember as well. But Neal, George and Mike all do a great cover of it.

Interesting… I just spotted this other blog entry about the song, on an Osmond blog?

Neal Morse vs The Osmonds

Teri will probably like this blog :/

I was listening to a CD I just got in by Neal Morse, excellent christian progressive rock. It came with a bonus CD, so after listening to the 1st cd, I popped in the 2nd CD, and the first song just made me jump back hmm 25-30 years maybe? WOW!!! Below is the original version that Teri will remember as well. But Neal, George and Mike all do a great cover of it.

Interesting… I just spotted this other blog entry about the song, on an Osmond blog?

Amp Room

I heard about this “idea” awhile back, never really knew what they meant until I ran it through my brain for awhile and then it dawned on me, and it’s a great idea. One thing that I am sure some churches struggle with (including ours) is guitar amps on stage being to loud, or just adding unwanted sound to the music. But, how does a guitarist hear himself if he doesn’t have the amp there.

One note before I go on. We have two guitarist now. One on bass, one on acoustic guitar. Both of them use DI (Direct Injection) boxes. The DI box takes the signal from the guitar itself, splits it up, sends the sound to the main mixer board, and then also to their amp. That way I get clean, un-modified sound. With Electric guitar I would not do this, I would either mic the amp, or pull signal after the amp processing so I get the exact type of sound that is being sent out from the amp.

Ok, back to the topic. I have started to hear about “amp room(s)”. Hmm interesting concept. Above is a photo of an amp room that I “borrowed” from the net. The way it works is… on stage, the guitarist just plugs in his guitar. That cord feeds into the “amp room” where the Amp is setup. These rooms can be fairly small, and since no one really sees them, you can us acoustic absorption devices to cut down on reverb and reflection. In this room is were the amp is “mic’d”. The sound from this mic is then fed to the mixer(s) and is sent back to the stage via the monitors or via In-Ear monitor (IEM). Whalla! Pure amp sound, with no amps on stage! Interesting huh? Of course this idea takes pre-planning in the building, but it is something I will keep in mind if I ever have input on a church/stage design.

Amp Room

I heard about this “idea” awhile back, never really knew what they meant until I ran it through my brain for awhile and then it dawned on me, and it’s a great idea. One thing that I am sure some churches struggle with (including ours) is guitar amps on stage being to loud, or just adding unwanted sound to the music. But, how does a guitarist hear himself if he doesn’t have the amp there.

One note before I go on. We have two guitarist now. One on bass, one on acoustic guitar. Both of them use DI (Direct Injection) boxes. The DI box takes the signal from the guitar itself, splits it up, sends the sound to the main mixer board, and then also to their amp. That way I get clean, un-modified sound. With Electric guitar I would not do this, I would either mic the amp, or pull signal after the amp processing so I get the exact type of sound that is being sent out from the amp.

Ok, back to the topic. I have started to hear about “amp room(s)”. Hmm interesting concept. Above is a photo of an amp room that I “borrowed” from the net. The way it works is… on stage, the guitarist just plugs in his guitar. That cord feeds into the “amp room” where the Amp is setup. These rooms can be fairly small, and since no one really sees them, you can us acoustic absorption devices to cut down on reverb and reflection. In this room is were the amp is “mic’d”. The sound from this mic is then fed to the mixer(s) and is sent back to the stage via the monitors or via In-Ear monitor (IEM). Whalla! Pure amp sound, with no amps on stage! Interesting huh? Of course this idea takes pre-planning in the building, but it is something I will keep in mind if I ever have input on a church/stage design.

Hands off my Equipment!

Argh… Sunday morning I was in a great mood, till I got to the church, did some sound checks, and noticed most of our stage equipment had been tampered with. Levels on the monitors had been messed with and the monitor mixer board had been messed with. So I went about getting things reset to best guess levels as fast as possible before practice started. During practice I had a few issues with feedback on the monitors, but worked them out fairly quick and thought I had it all under control.

At this point, I was still in a fairly good mood, enjoying Sunday School and then the worship service. (well… enjoying might be too much of a word, During the worship service I am usually a wreck, nervous, fidgeting with the main board, trying to make sure everything sounds good, make sure it’s not to loud, or too soft, etc.)….

Worship goes on, we are on the 4th or 5th song I think, then BAAMMM!! Huge low frequency feedback emitting from the stage. Panic city!! Gladly the worship team just kept going, no hiccups, no one stopped singing, just kept going. I will frantically dropping microphones from the mix one by one, trying to clear the problem, to no avail. I happened to look up and see Nathan (the pianist) missing with his piano, so I killed his monitor and that cleared the feedback. He kept his piano off and the 7 singers, along with a flute and bass guitar finished the song. It was actually really pretty sounding. After the song was over, I lowered levels on the piano monitor, and gave him the ok to turn things back on again, and the service went on.

I happily kept my cool, and last night during worship practice, my assistant and I completely re-set the monitor board from scratch. So we should be ok now. We figured out that possibly some kids from the spanish church that meets there on Tuesdays and Saturdays had probably been missing with the knobs and got things messed up. So, I had a little discussion with our pastor, politely stating that no kids should be allowed on stage for any service (unless of course it’s planned that way) and to assert to both congregations that no-one should be touching the equipment. And I think that with the real life experience that our church just had, they now understand why I don’t want anyone touching the AV equipment.

Hands off my Equipment!

Argh… Sunday morning I was in a great mood, till I got to the church, did some sound checks, and noticed most of our stage equipment had been tampered with. Levels on the monitors had been messed with and the monitor mixer board had been messed with. So I went about getting things reset to best guess levels as fast as possible before practice started. During practice I had a few issues with feedback on the monitors, but worked them out fairly quick and thought I had it all under control.

At this point, I was still in a fairly good mood, enjoying Sunday School and then the worship service. (well… enjoying might be too much of a word, During the worship service I am usually a wreck, nervous, fidgeting with the main board, trying to make sure everything sounds good, make sure it’s not to loud, or too soft, etc.)….

Worship goes on, we are on the 4th or 5th song I think, then BAAMMM!! Huge low frequency feedback emitting from the stage. Panic city!! Gladly the worship team just kept going, no hiccups, no one stopped singing, just kept going. I will frantically dropping microphones from the mix one by one, trying to clear the problem, to no avail. I happened to look up and see Nathan (the pianist) missing with his piano, so I killed his monitor and that cleared the feedback. He kept his piano off and the 7 singers, along with a flute and bass guitar finished the song. It was actually really pretty sounding. After the song was over, I lowered levels on the piano monitor, and gave him the ok to turn things back on again, and the service went on.

I happily kept my cool, and last night during worship practice, my assistant and I completely re-set the monitor board from scratch. So we should be ok now. We figured out that possibly some kids from the spanish church that meets there on Tuesdays and Saturdays had probably been missing with the knobs and got things messed up. So, I had a little discussion with our pastor, politely stating that no kids should be allowed on stage for any service (unless of course it’s planned that way) and to assert to both congregations that no-one should be touching the equipment. And I think that with the real life experience that our church just had, they now understand why I don’t want anyone touching the AV equipment.

Finally – A nice RPG Editor

For those that are not programmers, you can skip this blog :)

Today I happened upon a program called RPGAlive. Basically it’s a PC program that runs in the background, and “watches” your terminal emulation program. It can sense when SEU is running and then it reads the code and makes it “pretty” and a bit more understandable. One thing I have always disliked about IBM’s SEU or FSEDIT is they are very crude and not real intuitive. Since I have now moved from the S36 environment to the AS400, meaning I moved from FSEDIT (back) to SEU, I have not been very comfortable when I am coding, like I used to be with FSEDIT. Maybe this will change things.

(click on the image to see the full size and animation that shows what it does)

That is a screen shot that I “borrowed” from RPGAlive’s website to demostrate what it does. It is really helpful/useful when coding, especially if you are doing alot of loops or similar. I also like that feature that “underlines” fields for each type of oper command, so you know where the fields are without having to go to single line mode. Only problem with RGVAlive is it’s $800 price tag.

The above is another program I use from time to time called CodeStudio (and it’s FREE!), it’s a PC program that FTPs the source code from the 400, lets you modify it, then FTPs it back to the 400. Only problem is it has a few quirks that I don’t like, but I am starting to get used to it.

If I could get RPGAlive, I would probably switch back to SEU for all my coding. I have 30 days to try it out. After that I might end up switching back to CodeStudio.

Finally – A nice RPG Editor

For those that are not programmers, you can skip this blog :)

Today I happened upon a program called RPGAlive. Basically it’s a PC program that runs in the background, and “watches” your terminal emulation program. It can sense when SEU is running and then it reads the code and makes it “pretty” and a bit more understandable. One thing I have always disliked about IBM’s SEU or FSEDIT is they are very crude and not real intuitive. Since I have now moved from the S36 environment to the AS400, meaning I moved from FSEDIT (back) to SEU, I have not been very comfortable when I am coding, like I used to be with FSEDIT. Maybe this will change things.

(click on the image to see the full size and animation that shows what it does)

That is a screen shot that I “borrowed” from RPGAlive’s website to demostrate what it does. It is really helpful/useful when coding, especially if you are doing alot of loops or similar. I also like that feature that “underlines” fields for each type of oper command, so you know where the fields are without having to go to single line mode. Only problem with RGVAlive is it’s $800 price tag.

The above is another program I use from time to time called CodeStudio (and it’s FREE!), it’s a PC program that FTPs the source code from the 400, lets you modify it, then FTPs it back to the 400. Only problem is it has a few quirks that I don’t like, but I am starting to get used to it.

If I could get RPGAlive, I would probably switch back to SEU for all my coding. I have 30 days to try it out. After that I might end up switching back to CodeStudio.